Bagaboo Jumbo – one of my best purchases 2015

And that’s in competition with a CX bike purchase.

I started to commute by bike to work again at the end of summer. We have moved since the last time I did this and I have about 19 km one way now. When I spend roughly 9 hours a week commuting by bike it’s a bit easier to motivate purchases purely for that activity and I felt I wanted a backpack which could fit my work laptop and winter clothing without having to lay a puzzle every morning.

I looked at different bags and had almost settled for a Chrome Industries Barrage but when checking it out in a store it wasn’t that much larger than my current backpack. I also felt I would miss pockets for smaller items, the Barrage has none as far as I understand (except for a laptop sleeve and an enormous compartment between the outer and inner layer which can be access from the top of the bag). The same store had a Bagaboo Jumbo, which on first sight looked huge and not as stylish as the Barrage but after a bit of thinking I decided it was closer to what I was looking for and bought it instead. It was also more comfortable on my back than the Barrage.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Bagaboo Jumbo about half full (with my Thinkpad Restrospective 10 inside).

At first I didn’t care for the looks but I’m getting used to it and I now think it’s quite nice. The Barrage is more of what I would be comfortable with wearing for a walk in the city (in terms of looks) but the Bagaboo Jumbo has a rough functional look which I’m starting to think is quite nice.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Three outside pockets on the back.

The bag is closed by a rolltop and has three external pockets on the back with an additional pocket open on both sides (behind the lower pocket). The pockets are thin but can hold small items like wallet, keys and gloves. The top pocket is quite tall but overlaps the other pockets and competes with what’s inside the bag for space.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Rolltop closure.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Chest strap with plastic buckles, not as fancy as on the Chrome bags but functional.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Middle outer pocket.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Lower outer pocket.

The bag has a very comfortable shoulder straps but there is a lot of fabric around the neck so it gets a bit warm. Not a problem now in winter but I expect to get sweaty in the summer.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Comfortable shoulder padding.

The bag is huge but it compresses well when not fully filled and I’m not bothered by the size. The main point of buying new bag was to get more room.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Compression straps on the sides.

It has a clean outside but there are three loops on the back which can be used to attach additional lights, can probably be used for other things also but since I prefer to not attach stuff on the outside of bags I haven’t used them at all yet.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Blinky holder on the back.

When the bag opens up it gets very tall. I have used it to carry large cardboard boxes which go all the way to the top but then it’s not possible to close the flap, even if it expands to be able to close the bag when filled up. I haven’t tried how tall items I can carry and still being able to close the flap but I guess you need to be able to close the rolltop at least a little for it to work.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Open bag, the flap for closing the bag is expandable so you can use it even when filling the bag.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Waterproof inside.

Bagaboo Jumbo

Inside mesh pockets to keep smaller items in one place.

Bagaboo Jumbo

On the back of my 174 cm (~5’9) girlfriend (wearing a thick down jacket).

To summarize I’m really happy with the bag, much more than I thought I would be when I bought it. It may be stupid but I feel using it makes my commute more fun 🙂

You can read more about the bag on the Bagaboo homepage. If you live in Stockholm you can check it out at Urban Bike Wear where I bought mine.

CX SM 2015

Another short post in Swedish.
Idag åkte jag ut till Stora Skuggan för att titta på cyklister som körde runt, runt på gräset där. Nedan är en del av bildskörden, har många fler bilder och ska försöka få upp resten någonstans också. Om du letar efter bild på dig själv och är otålig, så kan du kommentera med startnummer nedan så kan jag se om jag har fångat dig.

Uppdatering: Jag har laddat upp bilder från Hjun/H30, Damsenior/Damveteran, H40/H50 och Herrsenior. Bilderna får användas för personligt bruk på Facebook, Instagram och liknande så länge jag (Magnus Källström eller @rallydatorn) anges som fotograf. Länk till album med en massa bilder på Flickr.

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

CX SM 2015

Bilder från Kringelcrossen 2015

Short post in Swedish.

Var ut till Södertälje idag och tittade på när kompisar tröttade ut sig i en CX-tävling. Passade på att ta några bilder, jag har laddat upp ett gäng i den här foldern på Picasa.

Om du hittar dig själv på någon bild så är det ok att använda den för privat bruk på Facebook, blogg, instagram och liknande så länge jag (Magnus Källström) anges som fotograf med en länk till den här sidan (https://mkallstrom.wordpress.com/).

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Kringelcrossen 2015

Vacation in Skåne, Sweden

Just back from a vacation trip in the south of Sweden, Skåne. We stayed in Ystad and made day trips around Österlen. It’s been a crappy summer here in Sweden but it seems to have arrived finally (too bad it’s almost over).

Kullens fyr

Kullens fyr, Kullaberg.

Climbing

Brösarps backar.

Evening

Evening at Ales stenar, Kåseberga.

Beach

Shoreline below Ales stenar, Kåseberga.

Ales stenar

Ales stenar, Kåseberga.

Skåne

Typical landscape in Skåne.

Skåne

Sheep at Ales stenar, Kåseberga.

Kivik

Apple trees in Kivik.

Kivik

Watching the ocean in Kivik.

Short roadtrip on the island of Ireland

Last week we visited family in Dublin and went on a short roadtrip to to the north. Since we were travelling with our little two year old girl we had plenty of opportunities to stop and enjoy the scenery 🙂

Northern Ireland

Just your normal view from a rest stop in Northern Ireland.

The plan was to visit Giant’s Causeway in Northern Ireland and on the way there we also stopped at Carrick-a-Rede to look at a famous rope bridge. I wasn’t so impressed with the actual bridge but the view from the walk there was nice. Our little girl decided to throw up in the car just after leaving the main rode towards the rope bridge and that maybe dampened my enthusiasm a little also.

Carrick-a-Rede

We saw plenty of impressing cliffs and sea on our trip.

Giant’s Causeway is an impressive place and I had thought a little bit about how to best photograph it. We started with a path high up on the cliffs which gave us a nice view of the area from above.

Giant's Causeway

View from trail marked as advanced cliff trail. In reality it wasn’t very advanced but gave nice views of the area from above.

When we got down to the seaside it started raining and since it was starting to get pretty late we didn’t hang around too long.

Giant's Causeway

When the sky is grey you take shots of the ground instead.

Giant's Causeway

The stone formations really are amazing!

Given the number of people who must visit this place there is of course plenty of shots of it already but I still think it would be an interesting place to spend some time at purely for taking photos, especially evenings or early mornings. That didn’t happen on this trip. We then drove to Portrush where we had booked rooms for the night.

View from Portrush

Houses by the coast, in a tiny little bit of sun light.

Hanging around in Portrush

Our girl taking a short rest and checking out passersby.

After a good night sleep and a short walk around town we continued towards Malin Head which is the most northern part of the island. We stayed at a B&B for one night and spent some time the next day walking along the cliffs and admiring the view.

Malin Head

Mother and daughter admiring the view.

Malin Head

About as far north as you can get in Ireland.

After that we felt it was time to head back to the city and started driving towards Dublin again. To make the trip a little more interesting we used the smaller coastal roads and stopped at every now and then so it ended up taking the better part of the day before we were back in Dublin again. All in all a very nice weekend trip!

Hiking in Cinque Terre

Just back from a trip to Cinque Terre in Liguria, Italy. We went there to hike and eat good food and had a great week! The Cinque Terre is a portion of coast on the Italian Riviera and comprises five small villages: Monterosso al Mare, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore. The villages are on the coast line and between them is a dramatic landscape with numerous well marked trails, perfect for day trips by foot. There is also a train line connecting the villages so it’s easy to explore the whole area and still stay in one place.

Manarola

Manarola

Vernazza

Vernazza

We flew to Milan (Linate airport) and took a direct train from Milan central station to Levanto where we stayed for the week. There are plenty of guide books about Cinque Terre so I won’t go into details about the trails we hiked. We bought a guide book with map from 2012 by Petra Holecek and Ulli Vogel locally and even if it was a few years old it served our purposes. Below are a few comments on hiking in the area:

  • The trails are well marked but there are a lot of them so a map is very useful
  • Early April is beginning of the main season but the villages were still quite busy, I can imagine that the middle of the summer is very crowded
  • Even if the villages were crowded we met very few people when hiking the higher trails. These trails also offer spectacular views of the coastline so I can really recommend them.
  • Since the villages are on the coastline hiking the higher trails means you will have to ascend a couple of hundred meters to reach them. It was quite a workout now but I guess it can be much worse in the summer heat.
  • Some of the trails run close to edges falling steeply into the ocean. I would use caution and maybe avoid some of the trails if wet.
Cinque Terre

Trail marking which makes it easy to find your way. Just watch out for where they go at intersections and in the villages.

Cinque Terre

Path above Monterosso

We stayed in Levanto just outside actual Cinque Terre and travelled around as follows (if there seems to be an interrest I will add some posts about them later on):

  • Day 1: Levanto to Monterosso
  • Day 2: Monterosso to Corniglia
  • Day 3: Levanto to Bonassola (with surroundings) and back
  • Day 4: Riomaggiore to Manarola
  • Day 5: Riomaggiore to Portovenere
  • Day 6: Vernazza to Monterosso

All of them were very nice but the best one would have to be Riomaggiore to Portovenere which had some spectacular views of the coastline. Vernazza to Monterosso was also very nice and a much easier hike.

Towards Portovenere

Trail towards Portovenere

Cinque Terre

View from above Bonassola

Cinque Terre

Trail towards Portovenere

Above Vernazza

Above Vernazza

Since the whole area is quite small and connected by train it leaves time to explore the villages even when hiking for a couple of hours between them.

Playing

Playing in Volastra

Cinque Terre

In one of the villages of Cinque Terre

Cinque Terre

View above Corniglia (I think)

Levanto

Levanto beach at sunset

All in all it was a great week and I can really recommend to go there!

m43-FF Comparison part III (Olympus E-M5 vs. EOS 6D)

As part of testing out my new Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 15 mm f/1.7 I did another m43/FF comparison (Olympus OM-D E-M5 and Canon EOS 6D). My main purpose was to make sure the Panasonic lens didn’t have any defects but also to do a comparison towards a prime lens on the full frame (35 mm) Canon, the EF 35 mm f/2. This lens has its problems but stopped down a little it’s quite sharp in the center (see photozone.de for test results) and I thought it would be fun to see how the m43 system performed compared to it.

I have tried to make the comparison as fair as possible but the following should be noted:

  • I don’t claim to have done a very scientific test, my main purpose was to see what kind of results I can achieve from the two systems during normal shooting conditions and with my normal post processing flow
  • I have shot in RAW and have used the same input sharpening settings (which give a result I’m happy with on both cameras) and adjusted white balance and exposure to get as similar looking images as possible. For some of the shots I have also adjusted highlights and shadows but I have done the same adjustments on the pictures from the two cameras
  • The 15 mm focal length on the m43 system equals a 30 mm on the Canon 6D, so while they don’t give the exact same framing they come pretty close after cropping the m43 shots to 3:2 aspect ratio
  • I have used aperture priority mode and let the camera meter and decide on shutter speed and ISO
  • I have set the aperture two stops smaller on the Canon to get the same DOF. For f/1.7 on the Panasonic lens I have used f/3.2 on the Canon which is almost two stops

And here are the photos! Click on the pictures to get to the full full resolution versions (JPG) if you want to compare details but I have also included a side-by-side comparison of 100% crops.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 with Panasonic Leica 15 mm f/1.7 @ f/1.7.

Canon EOS 6D with EF 35 mm f/2 @ f/3.2.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 with Panasonic Leica 15 mm f/1.7, 100% crop

Canon EOS 6D with EF 35 mm f/2, 100% crop.

 

Olympus OM-D E-M5 with Panasonic Leica 15 mm f/1.7 @ f/4.

Canon EOS 6D with EF 35 mm f/2 @ f/8.

Olympus

Olympus OM-D E-M5 with Panasonic Leica 15 mm f/1.7, 100% crop

Canon EOS 6D with EF 35 mm f/2, 100% crop.

Canon EOS 6D with EF 35 mm f/2, 100% crop.

 

Olympus OM-D E-M5 with Panasonic Leica 15 mm f/1.7 @ f/2.

Canon EOS 6D with EF 35 mm f/2 @ f/4.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 with Panasonic Leica 15 mm f/1.7, 100% crop

Olympus OM-D E-M5 with Panasonic Leica 15 mm f/1.7, 100% crop

Canon EOS 6D with EF 35 mm f/2, 100% crop.

Canon EOS 6D with EF 35 mm f/2, 100% crop.

 

Olympus OM-D E-M5 with Panasonic Leica 15 mm f/1.7 @ f/1.7.

Canon EOS 6D with EF 35 mm f/2 @ f/3.2.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 with Panasonic Leica 15 mm f/1.7, 100% crop

Olympus OM-D E-M5 with Panasonic Leica 15 mm f/1.7, 100% crop

Canon EOS 6D with EF 35 mm f/2, 100% crop.

Canon EOS 6D with EF 35 mm f/2, 100% crop.

 

Some observations:

  • The Canon shots show (IMHO slightly) more details, but the difference is mostly visible at maximum aperture on the Panasonic where it’s a little bit soft. Once stopped down the difference is not as obvious.
  • The comparison of f/1.7 on the Panasonic lens and f/3.2 on the Canon lens shows more background blur for the Canon since it’s not two full stops smaller. The Canon focal length of 35 mm is also a little bit longer than the full frame equivalent for the Panasonic (which is 30 mm).
  • The default images from the Olympus and the Canon look quite different in terms of color. I had to set the white balance of the Olympus colder and greener to make them look roughly the same.
  • These tests (and some additional ones) showed that my copy of the Panasonic was slightly decentered. I replaced it for a better one but the problem was mostly seen on the edge and corners of the frame and close to maximum aperture of the lens so I think it had very little impact on the result of this test.

I think I’m done with these kind of tests now. For me the difference in details is purely academic and I’m perfectly comfortable to use the m43 system instead of the Canon for all my amateur purposes. The full frame Canon of course has a clear advantage in high ISO performance and for sports I trust the auto focus more. If I want really thin DOF (as I see it not useful for more than full body portraits) the m43 system don’t have a lens to match my Sigma 85 f/1.4 on the Canon 6D. On the other hand, for travel where size and weight is an important aspect the m43 system has a clear advantage and my set of prime lenses for it (Panasonic Leica 15 mm f/1.7, Panasonic Leica 25 mm f/1.4 and Olympus 45 mm f/1.8) give me good enough possibilities to get some background blur and subject separation when needed.

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